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Mindhue Studio
Ted Ollier




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Graphic Panama Canal
Shaped copper relief
[22" x 22"]
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Printmaking and conceptual art

Media: Installation, Photography, Printmaking

Nave Gallery Annex
53 Chester Street #1

MAP # 11
Also Open Friday Night 6-9pm


Trolleys Sat+Sun | Directions (Google)

Web Site
www.mindhuestudio.com


 View Artist PDF

Images: []

Data. What is a datum? In a sea of undifferentiated grey, nothing sparks an interest. Add a speck, a dot, a mark, and something emerges from the gloom. Something draws the attention and the eye.
The world is, and we are designed to analyze it in ways that baffle the most advanced digital computational systems we can devise. Blur it, average it, dice it, compress it, and the mind still gleans some sort of information from the inputs it is provided.

I want the viewer to engage that process, revel in that process: this simple animal can take its primate hands and draw an alphabet, a map, or a blueprint. It can create a pot, a house, or a hydroelectric dam. Is data cold, hard, concrete? Of course it is, as are all raw materials. No one looks at the Pieta and complains of the inhumanity of the stone. No one gazes at a Rembrandt and shudders at the slickness of the glazing. But where did these things come from? From the data within, and the human desire to engage it.

Ted Ollier has been a photographer, graphic designer, bass player, typographer, web pioneer and armchair philosopher. He has also worked a variety of day-jobs, the details of which are not terribly important. At present, he is a printmaker and installation artist with an MFA from Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

His first taste of printmaking came at the age of 8 when he produced styrofoam relief prints on self-made paper in an art class at a local museum. Twenty years later, during his second undergraduate degree, he rediscovered the process and began making woodcuts, intaglio etchings and shaped copper relief prints. He has been working as an independent artist since 2004.

His concerns are with shapes and forms covered up by overfamiliarity and convention. He pulls these shapes and presents them in stark contrast. He uses technical means to extract unfamiliar information. He adapts industrial techniques to artistic ends.

Recently, he moved across the continent to reside in Somerville, a close neighborhood of Boston. His frequent companions are Bettina (a molecular biologist) and Raster (a flame-point Siamese).